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What to Do If the IRS Seizes Your Assets

Sep 28

The IRS can seize assets if you owe them money. This includes your home, car, bank account, and other property. The seizure is done to collect on back taxes. If the IRS seizes your assets, they will typically sell the property at auction and use the proceeds to pay off your tax debt. 

Although the IRS prefers to work with taxpayers to resolve their debt, they are within their rights to take action if you don't make an effort to pay what you owe. If you think the IRS may seize your assets, it's important to take action quickly. Below, we'll discuss what you need to do if the IRS seizes your assets. 

What to Do If the IRS Seizes Your Assets

The first thing you need to do is contact a tax attorney. They will help you navigate the complex legal process and figure out a payment plan that works for you. It's also important to file all of your tax returns so the IRS knows how much you actually owe. 

If you can't afford a tax attorney, there are a few other options available to you. The IRS has a Fresh Start Program that may allow you to negotiate a payment plan that works for your budget. You can also try negotiating with the IRS on your own, but this is not recommended unless you have experience dealing with them. 

If the IRS seizes your assets, it's important to take action quickly by contacting a tax attorney or another professional who can help you negotiate a payment plan. You should also make sure that all of your tax returns are filed so the IRS knows exactly how much money you owe them.

Everything You Need to Know About Bank Levies 

Blog Introduction: A bank levy is a legal process whereby the IRS can take money directly out of your bank account to satisfy a tax debt. The IRS can issue a bank levy without first notifying you or giving you a chance to appeal, which is why it's important to be proactive in ensuring that your tax liability is paid in full and on time. 

How Does a Bank Levy Work? 

When the IRS levies your bank account, they will notify your bank of their intention to take the money owed. The bank will then freeze the funds in your account, up to the amount of the debt plus any applicable penalties and interest. The IRS will typically give the bank 21 days' notice before actually withdrawing the funds. 

Once the funds have been withdrawn from your account, you will receive a notice from the IRS detailing the amount of money taken and what it was applied to. You will also be given information on how to appeal the levy if you believe it was issued in error. 

It's important to note that a bank levy does not necessarily mean that the IRS has seized all of the funds in your account. They may only take enough to cover the amount of tax debt you owe, plus any penalties and interest. However, if you have multiple outstanding taxes owed, the IRS can choose to seize all of the funds in your account up to the total amount owed across all taxes. 

What Happens if My Bank Account is Levied? 

If your bank account is levied, you will likely incur some fees from your bank. For example, if checks start bouncing because there are insufficient funds in your account, you may be charged returned check fees by your bank. Additionally, if you have automatic payments set up (such as for a car loan or mortgage), those payments may be missed due to the levy, which could result in late fees being assessed by your creditors. 

In addition to fees charged by your bank or creditors, a bank levy can also have a serious impact on your financial well-being. If all or most of the funds in your account are seized by the IRS, it can leave you unable to pay for essential expenses like food and shelter. This can obviously create significant hardship for both you and your family. Therefore, it's crucial to take action as soon as possible if you think there's a possibility that your bank account may be levied. 

A bank levy is a legal process whereby the IRS can take money directly out of your bank account to satisfy a tax debt. If you think there's a possibility that your bank account may be levied, it's crucial to take action as soon as possible. You should contact an experienced tax attorney who can help you resolve your tax liability and avoid having your assets seized by the IRS.